• Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity
  • Far Beyond My Capacity

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Masks of Nyarlathotep Campaign Journal: Chapter 34 - Out of the Fire and Into the Frying Pan

Leave a Comment
Following the exertions of their journey from Mombasa, George and Jacob were resting at the Highlands Hotel when a loud knock came at George's room door. It was two men from the King's African Rifles demanding entry. George greeted them and was told that he had to go with them; they were to take him to the hospital where he would be questioned alongside his companions about the fire on the train.

After collecting George the soldiers went next door and apprehended Jacob as well. They were marched down the road to the Highland Breeze Hospital where an official named Corporal Neville Witteringham was waiting in the ward where Hubert and Sebastian were recovering.

The King's African Rifles
Once they were all gathered the Corporal began questioning them about what had happened on the train. He took statements from them all, then concluded by warning them to keep their noses clean and not cause any trouble in Nairobi. The only other witness, the salon car porter, was dead, and so the authorities were having to take the matter seriously. Hubert mentioned that he had seen the porter smoking in the water closet!
Read More...

Monday, August 04, 2014

Masks of Nyarlathotep Campaign Journal: Chapter 33 - The Fires of Africa

Leave a Comment
The investigators took the time on the journey from Sydney to Mombasa to rest, recuperate and study their notes following their narrow escape from the City of Pnakotus last session. Travelling on a Baffrey's line steamship they spent a week in Singapore due to some technical issues with the ship, then headed on to Bombay and finally arrived in Mombasa.

Mombasa travel guide, 1925
This city was Arabic in nature, with those famous narrow and redolent alleys, elaborately decorated balconies, mosques and minarets, muezzins and veils. The famous merchant city and former slave-trading centre was ancient, only a few centuries newer than Cairo itself. About 30,000 lived there on the edge of the Indian Ocean, combining bits and slabs of Arabic, African, Indian, Portuguese, and British ways of life. Pre-colonial traders built Mombasa on a coral island just offshore, for purposes of defence. A railway causeway and foot-traffic ferries connected island and continent.
Read More...

Monday, July 28, 2014

The Fall by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan

Leave a Comment
The Fall (The Strain Trilogy, #2)The Fall by Guillermo del Toro
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I have to admit I struggled a bit with this book. I stopped reading it halfway through and got distracted by some Lovecraft (an easy thing to get distracted by), and I only picked it up again due to boredom (and it didn't compare particularly well to the Lovecraft I had been reading either).

The problem is that the story just isn't that interesting, the writing style isn't particularly dynamic and some of the dialogue is extremely hokey. After the interesting twist on the vampire mythology unleashed in the first book this one didn't seem to go anywhere, and took a long time to do it.

The book did pick up towards the end, and it was great that by the end of the book things had changed so drastically for all the characters and the world they inhabit. It's the promise of a changed world that has me reading the third book in the series now. If the big changes hadn't happened at the end of The Fall I don't think I would have bothered, though the book does seem like a long set up for the final novel as a consequence.

Let's hope that The Night Eternal redeems the series somewhat.

View all my reviews

Friday, July 18, 2014

Camelot Unchained BSC Days in Review

2 comments
Well, what a week! If you've followed the various reveals in the Camelot Unchained BSC (Bat Shit Crazy) Days you'll know what I mean. I thought the week overall was a great success. We got to know the team at City State Entertainment much better, the presentations were a lot of fun, and we got to see why CU might just be the most innovative MMO for years.

First of all a quick recap on some of the reasons I backed CU during the original Kickstarter. A good deal of the reason was the 15 foundational principles and the 11 promises they made to their backers. If all they were doing was creating a Dark Age of Camelot 2, with the tri-realm PvP and realm pride that game had it would have been enough. Tie it into a voxel-based, minecraft-style building system where players and guilds can build their own homes, taverns, towns and cities, and then fight over them, and then add the unique crafting economy... well I was pretty much sold.


They seemed to be doing a lot of things right, and a lot of the things I've written about before. Player-based economies, sandbox game play, mechanics to drive communities, horizontal progression, and the like.

It also helped that I was a big fan of the lore of Dark Age of Camelot, and the new lore they revealed during the Kickstarter campaign felt even better. I loved the idea of the Veilstorms that might crop up where huge battles and release of magic, changing the world as they raged. I loved the idea of trading settlements instead of auction houses. I loved that they were building an MMO engine from scratch in order to deliver battles containing hundreds of players with no graphics lag and high framerates.

Well, what we saw this week has gotten me both infinitely more excited and also a little worried too. The systems they are putting in place are so innovative and off the wall they they really could change the MMO game space and move things forward. They are also crazy enough that there is plenty of risk involved, but CSE made that plain right from the start of the Kickstarter.

This week was intended as a series of presentations to the game's backers of the detailed game systems that will be used. The systems are subject to changes depending on the discussions in the backer forums and the results of internal and alpha testing.

Here's a brief run-down on the major reveals of the week, along with my thoughts on each.
Read More...

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Masks of Nyarlathotep Campaign Journal: Chapter 32 - Into the Light

Leave a Comment
Following the frustrations of the previous session this one proved to be much more relaxing; for me at least. I knew before we started it would likely see the end of the Australian chapter of the campaign, one way or the other at least. The only question was which of the investigators would survive.

We began with the investigators still recovering from the shock of their encounter with the flying polyp. Rodrigo staggered back to his feet, dirt still clinging to his chewing lips, his eyes wide and wild.


Kakakatak was eager to move away from the gaping trapdoor in case more polyps arrived, and so the group moved on through the darkness of the city. They travelled through the dusty underworld for hours, passing huge ancient buildings whose extent was only dimly hinted at by the light of their torches. They rested several times. Eventually Kakakatak stopped. "WE ARE HERE".
Read More...